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Celebrate The Small Things

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Celebrate The Small Things is a weekly blog hop, wherein we post our celebrations each Friday, no matter how big or small. You can sign up here. Thanks to our host Lexa Cain and her co-hosts L.G. Keltner @ Writing Off The Edge and Katie @ TheCyborgMom for continuing what VikLit started!

 

This week, I’m celebrating:

  1. Getting help where you least expected it. I’ve been distracted of late due to some troubling news. I ended up sharing it with a colleague of mine (not something I normally do), and to my surprise, got some pretty useful advice from her. Whether or not they would work, I don’t know, but I suppose I’m celebrating more the fact that she actually took the time to give the matter some thought when I only mentioned it in passing.

  2. My mom’s cataract surgery went well.

  3. The weekend! It feels like it’s been a long, slog of a week and I’m so ready for the break.

 

What are you celebrating this week? Have you had someone go above and beyond what you expected of them? Anything you got planned this weekend? Hope you all have a good one!

 


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Author Interview Series: Behind The Scenes with Callum McLaughlin

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Everyone’s journey to publication is different and unique. In Behind The Scenes, I interview writers who tell us how they started and got to where they are today. With the knowledge that comes from experience, they share their words of wisdom with us. If you’re a writer, I’d love to hear about your journey! Please contact me here if you’re interested in being interviewed. New interviews featured every second and last Monday of the month.

Callum McLaughlin writes gripping suspense thrillers and is also a published poet in his own right. His latest offering, Seeking Solace, showcases his talent in a collection of sixty poems.

 

1. Tell us a bit about your writing journey. How did you get started, and how did you get to where you are now?

I first started out professionally a few years ago. I volunteered my time at a local magazine, gaining experience in various forms of research and writing, as well as undertaking a short photo-journalism course. With this training on my CV, I started to work on a freelance basis, allowing me the perfect balance of time to also work on my own creative writing.

 

2. Anything you would’ve done differently if you could do it all over again?

Probably not, to be honest. Things have gone fairly well thus far and I’m happy to keep working away at my craft, hopefully learning and improving as I go.

 

3. What advice would you give to new and aspiring writers?

The most obvious yet crucial piece of advice is simply to write. It’s surprising how many people want to but never actually get around to it, constantly coming up with excuses or reasons why we think it will never happen. As they say, you can edit a load of rubbish but you can’t edit a blank page: Just write, write, and write some more.
Other than that, I’d say it’s just as important to read. The more you surround yourself with literature, the more your own style and voice can develop.

 

4. Is there any book you’ve written that is particularly special to you? Which one and why?

They’re all special to me in their own way and I suppose they always will be. I would say that my most recent release, Seeking Solace, feels particularly precious right now. Being my first poetry collection, it was a real tick on the bucket list and something I’d have scarcely believed possible a few years ago.

 

5. Who would you say is your favorite character(s) from your books, and why? What is it about this character that makes him/her tick?

Like with the books themselves, it’s tough to single out any one character. My two protagonists, Eva and Abi – from The Vessel and False Awakening respectively – are very special to me because they carry their particular stories, and though their circumstances are very different, they are both ordinary people who find themselves in extraordinary situations and simply strive to do the best they can.

 

6. Tell us about your latest project. What are you working on at the moment, and what can we expect from it?

I’ve been enjoying the release of Seeking Solace recently but as for current works in progress, I’m writing poetry as ever and have a new piece of fiction in the planning stages. It’s something totally different from what I’ve done before that I’m getting very excited about delving into.

 

7. Are you self-pubbed or traditionally published? What made you go for this model? What advice/tips can you share with writers working towards the same goal?

I’m self-published thus far. It’s not to say I don’t see the merits and drawbacks in both routes, it’s just been what I believed was right for me and my books up until this point, which is the approach I will always take. I was attracted to the notion of taking things at my own pace and keeping control of my own work, which felt right particularly when entering the industry for the first time.

To anyone looking to follow a similar path, I’d say set clear goals to keep yourself motivated, as being your own boss can be both a blessing and a curse, but also don’t be afraid to change your mind if need be (that is, after all, the beauty of self-publishing). Aside from that I think the most important thing is to surround yourself with good people. Be they online or offline, feeling part of a like-minded community will pay dividends when it comes to the big release day. It can be all too easy to write away for months without so much as breathing a word of your intentions to publish, but you’ll be thankful for the helping hand and moral support later down the line.

 

Author Bio: Born and raised in the Scottish countryside, Callum McLaughlin works as a freelance content writer and in November 2013, published his first book. He has since followed this with a second novel and outside of fiction, he is also a keen poet and a lover of all things literature, music and nature, taking his biggest inspiration from the world around us.

Where to find Callum:     Blog     Goodreads     Twitter

 


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I’m a Tortoise, Not A Hare (IWSG)

Writing is like driving at night in the fog. You can only see as far as your headlights, but you can make the whole trip that way. – E. L. Doctorow

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It’s the first Wednesday of the month, which means it’s time for our group posting for IWSG. Insecure Writer’s Support Group is the brainchild of Ninja Captain Alex J. Cavanaugh, and his co-hosts for April are Suzanne Furness, Tonja Drecker, Toi Thomas, Rachna Chhabria, Fundy Blue, and Donna Hole!

As A-Z’ers kick off the A-Z Challenge and Campers get busy for a month of Camp NaNoWriMo, I find myself stuck as everyone else surges forward this crazy month. A-Z has always seemed so daunting to me, but Camp seemed like a good idea, especially since I really had fun with it last year.

In the end, I had to make a decision: Do I get back to creating, or do I stick with revising? I could have countless drafts and it won’t do me any good if I can’t see something to the very end—something that I would actually be proud to let others read (which is an insecurity that I will save for another day). There are times when I feel like I’m going in circles, reading and revising the same chapters over and over again. Is there any point to all of this, or am I deceiving myself? Am I chasing something that will never be? But I still love the story, and no matter how long a break I take from writing, I inevitably keep coming back. That, at least, has to mean something, doesn’t it?

One of my current WIP’s is my Camp novel from last year, Lost. It currently sits at 60,940 words. It’s very slow progress, considering I finished Camp with 51k words. I spent a lot of time second-guessing the third person narrative in which it was originally written. I ended up rewriting a portion of it in first person, just to see if that suited the story better. It didn’t. While some parts worked better with the first person voice, the over-all story suffered from it. So back to third person I went.

Maybe it’s a natural progression, something I had to do and see for myself, to see how the narrative plays out. Or maybe I wouldn’t have wasted all that time if I had a writers group or a CP. Who knows? Sometimes it feels like I’m hardly moving at all.

Do you find yourself rewriting scenes in different points of view, just to see how it works out? At what stage of writing/revisions do you feel confident enough to show your novel to others? How did you find your writers group and/or critique partner, if you have one? Any tips on how to find one?


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Author Interview: Behind The Scenes with Annalisa Crawford

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Everyone’s journey to publication is different and unique. In Behind The Scenes, I interview writers who tell us how they started and got to where they are today. With the knowledge that comes from experience, they share their words of wisdom with us. If you’re a writer, I’d love to hear about your journey! Please contact me here if you’re interested in being interviewed. New interviews featured every second and last Monday of the month.

Annalisa Crawford joins me in this edition of Behind The Scenes. Annalisa is a contributor in The Cat Who Chose Us and other Cat Stories–a must-have for cat-lovers everywhere. She is also the author of That Sadie Thing and Other Stories and Our Beautiful Child.

 

1. Tell us a bit about your writing journey. How did you get started, and how did you get to where you are now?

I remember writing a brilliant story about a flying golden horse when I was about 8 – I guess that’s where it started! My dad bought me a subscription to a writing magazine when I was still at school, and that’s when I began submitting to literary journals. At 20, I had two short stories published within two months of each other. But then it all slowed down a little – one acceptance every couple of years or so.

I kept writing though and by 2011 I was getting ready to shelve my novella, Cat and The Dreamer. On a whim I sent it to a publisher – Vagabondage Press – just to have someone read it one last time. They accepted it, and later took my novella trilogy, Our Beautiful Child, as well.

 

2. Anything you would’ve done differently if you could do it all over again?

I wish my career had started properly sooner, but because I write novellas and short novels I guess had to wait for the rise of ebooks to get a foot in the door. Not many traditional publishers would want to risk a 73 page novella by an unknown writer. So, actually, no I wouldn’t have done anything differently – the time and the place were perfect.

 

3. What advice would you give to new and aspiring writers?

• Don’t fear rejection – it’s a learning curve.
• Don’t submit, or publish, your first draft – you might think it’s brilliant now, but it probably needs a little more work.
• Use beta readers – and accept constructive criticism.
• Don’t give up.

 

4. Is there any book you’ve written that is particularly special to you? Which one and why?

My most recent book, Our Beautiful Child, took me a long time to write. The first two stories came quite easily, but I knew I wanted to make it a trilogy and the third story eluded me for a long time. In the end, the trigger was a song I used to listen to all the time – whenever I heard it, I’d get this feeling, until one day the whole story just appeared. I remember the relief when I realised my trilogy would become a reality.

 

5. Who would you say is your favorite character(s) from your books, and why? What is it about this character that makes him/her tick?

My favourite character is Murray from one of the stories in Our Beautiful Child. He’s based on a couple of people I went to school with. He’s the mysterious love interest, dark and dangerous, with a secret. As I was writing him, he took on a whole backstory that I hadn’t expected.

 

6. Tell us about your latest project. What are you working on at the moment, and what can we expect from it?

I’ve returned to my first love, short story writing. It’s been a long time since I’ve written – or submitted – short fiction, so I’m looking forward to seeing what I can come up with. I love writing with no idea of where the story is going. I take advantage of the short form to avoid explaining anything, to just dump the reader into something extraordinary or confusing.

 

7. Are you self-pubbed or traditionally published? What made you go for this model? What advice/tips can you share with writers working towards the same goal?

I’ve published both ways. I love having a publisher, because I need to have someone believe in me, which you don’t get with self-publishing. However, I self-published a collection of short stories, That Sadie Thing, because they’d all been either published in literary journals or had placed/been on the shortlist of competitions – I call it my greatest hits collection – and it was just an easy way to get them in front of new readers. Some of the literary journals had very small print runs, and I’m sure no more than a couple of people read them originally!

My advice would simply to be aware of your options, and know why you want to take one path over another. They are both rewarding, in very different ways.

 

AnnalisaCrawfordAuthor Bio: Annalisa Crawford lives in Cornwall UK, with a good supply of moorland and beaches to keep her inspired. She lives with her husband, two sons, a dog and a cat.

Crawford writes dark contemporary, character-driven stories, with a hint of the paranormal. She has been winning competitions and publishing short stories in small press journals for many years, and published her first book, Cat and The Dreamer in 2012.

Where to find Annalisa:    Website      Blog      Goodreads      Twitter

 


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Celebrate The Getaway (CTST Post)

Summer came a bit early, as I went on a quick get-away to Boracay, Philippines, escaping the gloom of Hong Kong.

I’ve had it on my “Places-to-Go” list for a while now, as I’ve heard nothing but rave reviews from people who’s been there before, and with the exception of some algae covering certain parts of the shore (apparently this isn’t exactly the best time to visit), it was everything it promised to be.

Beach-Boracay

I’ll work on a proper post with photos for next week, but for now, I’m going to focus on my celebrations:

  1. Cheap tour packages.

  2. Simple pleasure of looking up at the night sky and watching the stars. Orion was the only constellation I was familiar with, but the clear night sky is definitely a sight for sore eyes! Hong Kong is a smog-filled city, which means a few stars here and there is all the treat I get, even on a good night.

  3. I survived my first-ever parasailing experience, and actually thought it was fun–well except for that brief moment as I was going up where I had this morbid idea that I’d just fly away, never to be found again. But, all’s well that ends well, and I get to tick off something off my bucket list. =)

 

What are you celebrating this week? What’s your ideal getaway vacation? Have you been parasailing before? How was it for you?

 

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Celebrate The Small Things is a weekly blog hop, wherein we post our celebrations each Friday, no matter how big or small. You can sign up here. Thanks to our host Lexa Cain and her co-hosts L.G. Keltner @ Writing Off The Edge and Katie @ TheCyborgMom for continuing what VikLit started!


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Celebrate The Small Things

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It’s Friday, which means it’s time for Celebrate The Small Things. Thanks to our host Lexa Cain and her co-hosts L.G. Keltner @ Writing Off The Edge and Katie @ TheCyborgMom for continuing what VikLit started!

Things have been pretty bleak and gloomy in general. Maybe it’s because of the dreary weather, maybe it’s just the overwhelming pressure I’m feeling, both at work and in my personal life. Either way, now is a good time to take stock of the small things that make it all OK.

  1. I survived a pretty daunting business meeting where it’s just me against five people. It almost felt like a panel job interview all over again! So yeah, I’m feeling a bit good about being able to hold my own and working out compromises that are acceptable to both sides.

  2. Found the perfect outfit just when I was about to give up.

  3. Edited a chapter in my current WIP. It’s not much, but it’s progress, at least!

  4. Silly, entertaining movies like Kingsman, The Secret Service. If you haven’t seen it yet, I highly recommend it, although the violence might be a bit too much at times. And if you have seen it, well who can forget how much fun was it to watch that fight scene while Give It Up by KC & The Sunshine Band played in the background?

What are you celebrating this week? Have you seen Kingsman? What did you think of it?

 

Celebrate The Small Things is a weekly blog hop, wherein we post our celebrations each Friday, no matter how big or small. You can sign up here.


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Author Interview: Behind The Scenes with Lori L. MacLaughlin

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Everyone’s journey to publication is different and unique. In Behind The Scenes, I interview writers who tell us how they started and got to where they are today. With the knowledge that comes from experience, they share their words of wisdom with us. If you’re a writer, I’d love to hear about your journey! Please contact me here if you’re interested in being interviewed. New interviews featured every second and last Monday of the month.

With me today is Lori L. MacLaughlin. Her debut novel,  Lady, Thy Name Is Trouble, is an epic fantasy story of swords-for-hire sisters Tara and Laraina Triannon, and is now available at your favorite retailers.

 

1. Tell us a bit about your writing journey. How did you get started, and how did you get to where you are now?

Thank you so much for having me here! My writing odyssey began way back in the 1980s when I was working on my parents’ dairy farm. Some of the chores, like mucking out stalls, spreading sawdust for bedding, and throwing down hay for the animals, didn’t require a lot of thought, so my mind would wander, and I’d make up stories to pass the time. One day my Mom suggested I write down the stories in my head. I tried it and discovered a whole new realm of joy.

I’d always considered writing a hobby until the last year or so. At that point I made the conscious choice to start treating my writing as a business with the ultimate goal of self-publishing my work. I made a list of all the things I’d need to learn about and do, and step by step, reached my goal.

 

2. Anything you would’ve done differently if you could do it all over again?

I wish I’d gotten serious about my writing a lot sooner. But then life has a way of shifting priorities…

 

3. What advice would you give to new and aspiring writers?

Start building your social media/marketing platform long before you’re ready to publish. Revise your work until it’s as good as you can make it, then hire an editor and revise some more. Invest in a good cover designer. I think those are the most important things.

 

4. Is there any book you’ve written that is particularly special to you? Which one and why?

I’ve written two and a half novels, the first of which has just been released. This first book, Lady, Thy Name Is Trouble, will always be most special to me. The main character, Tara, is my alter ego. If I lived in a world such as hers, I would be her.

 

5. Who would you say is your favorite character(s) from your books, and why? What is it about this character that makes him/her tick?

That is a tough question. My first inclination is to say Tara, because she’s such a part of me. She’s an adventurer, vulnerable on the inside but hard and cold as the steel of her blade on the outside. She’s been hurt too many times to let anyone inside her guard.

However, I’m teetering toward choosing Captain Natiere, the wolf-like executioner known as the Butcher. He claims the wolves as his kin, though he’s not a shapeshifter. He’s also been shaped by a traumatic past, but there is so much more to him than anyone realizes. He holds many secrets in the unfathomed depths of his soul.

 

6. Tell us about your new book. What can we expect from it?

Lady, Thy Name Is Trouble is a fantasy adventure, sword and sorcery with a side of romance. It’s about two sword-for-hire sisters who get into a heap of trouble by being in the wrong place at the right time. Here is the really short blurb:

A brutal invasion. A terrifying assassin empowered by wolves. A swordswoman, gifted with magic and cursed by nightmares that are all too real. With the help of her sword-wielding sister, an aging adventurer, a secretive soldier of fortune, and a sorceress whose spells often go askew, Tara Triannon must stop an army led by a madman and fend off an evil being caught in a centuries-old trap who seeks to escape through her dreams — all while keeping one step ahead of the Butcher.

 

7. Are you self-pubbed or traditionally published? What made you go for this model? What advice/tips can you share with writers working towards the same goal?

I am self-published. I originally started down the road to traditional publishing, but the long wait times between hearing back from submissions and the shrinking market sent me down the self-publishing path. I also much prefer having sole control over every aspect of the publishing process.

My advice would be to research both models and choose which one is right for you. The Internet is full of resources, and countless bloggers generously share their publishing experiences. Take advantage of all that’s out there. If you decide to self-pub, invest the time and money to put forward your best product.

 

Author Bio:

Lori L. MacLaughlin traces her love of fantasy adventure to Tolkien and Terry Brooks, finding The Lord of the Rings and The Sword of Shannara particularly inspirational. She’s been writing stories in her head since she was old enough to run wild through the forests on the farm on which she grew up.

She has been many things over the years – tree climber, dairy farmer, clothing salesperson, kids’ shoe fitter, retail manager, medical transcriptionist, journalist, private pilot, traveler, wife and mother, Red Sox and New York Giants fan, muscle car enthusiast and NASCAR fan, and a lover of all things Scottish and Irish.

When she’s not writing (or working), she can be found curled up somewhere dreaming up more story ideas, taking long walks in the countryside, or spending time with her kids. She lives with her family in northern Vermont.

Where to find Lori:    Website      Goodreads      Twitter

 


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Author Interview: Behind The Scenes with Rachel Schieffelbein

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Everyone’s journey to publication is different and unique. In Behind The Scenes, I interview writers who tell us how they started and got to where they are today. With the knowledge that comes from experience, they share their words of wisdom with us. If you’re a writer, I’d love to hear about your journey! Please contact me here if you’re interested in being interviewed. New interviews featured every second and last Monday of the month.

Joining me today is Rachel Schieffelbein, who writes YA novels. Whether you’re into zombies or modern-day retellings of fairy tales (which I absolutely love!), Rachel is sure to take you an a thrilling adventure.

 

1. Tell us a bit about your writing journey. How did you get started, and how did you get to where you are now?

When I first started I wanted to write picture books, but I wasn’t very good at it. It wasn’t until much later that I decided to try my hand at YA, and I’m thankful I did. That’s where I found my voice. I also started blogging a few years ago and met a lot of wonderful writers, including my critique partners, and without them I would probably still be writing in circles. Writing, but not improving. I owe a lot to them.

 

2. Anything you would’ve done differently if you could do it all over again?

Maybe be more patient, which is something I still struggle with to be honest. In the past I’ve sent queries when I wasn’t ready. It’s a hard mistake, but I learned from it.

 

3. What advice would you give to new and aspiring writers?

As everyone says, “Write, write, write. Read, read, read.” But also, connect. Get online, meet other writers, read writers’ blogs, agents’ blogs, book reviewers’ blogs. There’s so much to learn that way.

 

4. Is there any book you’ve written that is particularly special to you? Which one and why?

RUN FOR THE ROSES is set within the world of Arabian horse showing, something I did for many years before I had kids, and have started to do again. It’s a unique setting, it really is like its own little culture in some ways. And I really loved being able to share that world with my readers, and to (hopefully) show the bond between a rider and her horse.

 

5. Who would you say is your favorite character(s) from your books, and why? What is it about this character that makes him/her tick?

One of my favorites characters to write was Anya, from DON’T FALL. It’s a contemporary Rapunzel retelling, and she was my Rapunzel. She’s sweet, optimistic, and enthusiastic. It was her enthusiasm that made her so fun to write, to get into her head and just enjoy the world and all it has to offer.

 

6. Tell us about your latest project. What are you working on at the moment, and what can we expect from it?

I’m working on a YA contemporary about a teenage girl who has a pregnancy complication that leads to her moving away from home, and her boyfriend. She goes to stay with her aunt and uncle, so she can be at a hospital where she’ll receive better care. She’s dealing with the pregnancy, her cousin and her snotty friends, and a growing doubt about whether or not to give up her baby.

 

7. Are you self-pubbed or traditionally published? What made you go for this model? What advice/tips can you share with writers working towards the same goal?

I have two YA novellas and one novel published by Swoon Romance, and a YA zombie novel that I self pubbed. I’ve enjoyed both experiences. It was great having a team behind me for the YA contemporaries, I love my editor at Swoon, Mandy Schoen. But the freedom that comes with self-publishing can be great as well. For example, since I wrote the zombie book for my husband, I was able to release it on his birthday, which was fun.
Whether you plan to self pub, or seek traditional publishing, the best advice I can give you is to put your best foot forward. Make sure you’ve written the best story you can, get it critiqued by people you trust, revise, revise, revise. The more work you put into it, the more you’ll get out of it.

 

Author Bio:

Rachel Schieffelbein grew up in a tiny town in Southeast Minnesota reading books, riding horses, and participating in speech and theater. She is now married with four kids and enjoys reading books, riding horses, and coaching speech and theater. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it!

She enjoys writing characters she can relate to, ones she would want to hang out with, or fall in love with. She hopes her readers will love them, too.

She is the author of SECONDARY CHARACTERS, RUN FOR THE ROSES, DON’T FALL, and FLESH EATING ZOMBIES AND EVIL EX-GIRLFRIENDS. She also writes New Adult under the pen name Georgia St. Mane.

Where to find Rachel:    Facebook     Blog     Twitter

 


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Celebrate The Small Things

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It’s Friday, which means it’s time for Celebrate The Small Things. Thanks to our host Lexa Cain and her co-hosts L.G. Keltner @ Writing Off The Edge and Katie @ TheCyborgMom for continuing what VikLit started!

I had to work last weekend so it feels like it’s been one super long week. But we’re having a long weekend due to Lunar New Year celebrations so yay for that!

Things I’m also celebrating:

  1. Dinner and catching up with a friend I haven’t seen for a while.

  2. Curling up this weekend with a good book.

  3. Good food and great friends!

 

What are you celebrating this week?

 

Celebrate The Small Things is a weekly blog hop, wherein we post our celebrations each Friday, no matter how big or small. You can sign up here.


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Author Interview: Behind The Scenes with Lynda R. Young

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Everyone’s journey to publication is different and unique. In Behind The Scenes, I interview writers who tell us how they started and got to where they are today. With the knowledge that comes from experience, they share their words of wisdom with us. If you’re a writer, I’d love to hear about your journey! Please contact me here if you’re interested in being interviewed. New interviews featured every second and last Monday of the month.

Lynda R. Young is with me today to talk about her journey. She mixes her love of storytelling with game-development. She is a contributor in The Insecure Writer’s Support Group Guide to Publishing and Beyond, which is available as a free download, thanks to the wonderful people at IWSG.

 

1. Tell us a bit about your writing journey. How did you get started, and how did you get to where you are now?

Despite being a slow reader, I couldn’t get enough. The authors made writing look easy. I didn’t realize how much work goes into making the writing look effortless. So with no clue whatsoever, I embarked on my writing journey with a head full of dreams and a heart full of possibility.

It took me nine years to finish my first epic of 219k words. Back then, finding information on the industry was next to impossible unless you knew someone on the inside. I knew no one. Consequently, I remained clueless and eventually gave up trying to get published. It took ten years before writing drew me back. The internet opened up new possibilities. Armed with new knowledge and an online support group of writers, I charged forth. I even wrote books that were almost publishable. While I’ve found success getting short stories published and even a novelette, I’m still working on getting a novel published.

 

2. Anything you would’ve done differently if you could do it all over again?

If I had to do it all over again, I wouldn’t have given up so easily. Yes, it’s a difficult industry to break into, but it’s not impossible and we have so many more choices today. Also, when you stop writing for an extended time, you lose some of your writing skills and confidence. It takes a long while to get them back.

 

3. What advice would you give to new and aspiring writers?

My advice to writers is if you are serious about getting published, then go ahead and eat a slice of reality pie: Writing is the easiest part of it all and that’s still not easy. Once you’ve digested that morsel, enjoy what you do, learn everything you can about the craft, the market, and the industry as a whole. Read a lot and don’t give up. Keep writing.

 

4. Is there any book you’ve written that is particularly special to you? Which one and why?

The first book I ever wrote is particularly special to me. It remains a hot mess, I might’ve been clueless, I may have made a gazillion mistakes about character arcs, word count, and general storytelling, but I completed it the best I could at the time. I didn’t let fear hold me back.

 

5. Who would you say is your favorite character(s) from your books, and why? What is it about this character that makes him/her tick?

My favorite characters are the ones who are nothing like me because they are a challenge to write and fun to get into their head.

 

6. Tell us about your latest project. What are you working on at the moment, and what can we expect from it?

My latest project is one that’s taken me in an unexpected direction, a different avenue of storytelling. I’m currently working on a game based on a world I created for one of my books. It has presented a whole set of new challenges, but I’m loving it.

 

7. Are you self-pubbed or traditionally published? What made you go for this model? What advice/tips can you share with writers working towards the same goal?

I’ve experienced both self-publishing and traditional publishing. Each project demands its own route for various reasons. For example, I’ve chosen to self-publish a daily devotional this year because the traditional market isn’t in demand for this kind of book. My advice is to remain flexible to the many options available to us. Don’t choose self-publishing because you think it will be easier. It’s not. However, both paths are equally rewarding. And don’t forget to keep writing.

 

Author Bio: Lynda R Young writes speculative short stories and is currently writing novels for young adults. In her spare time she also dabbles in photography and all things creative. She lives in Sydney, Australia, with her sweetheart of a husband who is her rock. You can find her here: Blog, Twitter, Facebook, Goodreads